• References We Used As We Developed Kidzmet

    References We Used As We Developed Kidzmet

    Genesis of Kidzmet While we started building the current version of Kidzmet in late 2010, the inspiration for the idea actually came from Jen Lilienstein’s undergraduate…

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    References We Used As We Developed Kidzmet

    Genesis of Kidzmet

    While we started building the current version of Kidzmet in late 2010, the inspiration for the idea actually came from Jen Lilienstein’s undergraduate senior thesis in 1994. Under the direction of Dr. Francesca Cancian at UCI, Jen studied the effect of the implementation of Howard Gardner’s multiple intelligence theory (or lack thereof) in varying types of schools (public, parochial, Waldorf and Montessori) and the corresponding effect on absenteeism, self-esteem/self-worth, love of learning and students’ openness to future career directions.

    A large number of reference sources were used in the development of Kidzmet’s preference profiles and matching algorithms…and are used in the ongoing development of Kidzmet’s newsletters and course materials. The following books are referred to and cross-referenced continually to make sure we are providing our members with thoroughly researched and cross-checked content.

    Personality Type

    Meisgeier, C. H., & Murphy, E. (1987). MMTIC Manual: A Guide to the Development and Use of the Murphy-Meisgeier Type Indicator for Children. Palo Alto, CA: Consulting Psychologists Press.

    Hirsh, S., & Kise, J.. (2006). Work It Out: Using Personality Type to Improve Team Performance. Mountain View, CA: Davies-Black Publishing.

    Briggs Myers, Isabel, McCaulley, Mary H., Quenk, Naomi L., & Hammer, Allen L. (1998). MBTI Manual (A guide to the development and use of the Myers Briggs type indicator) (3rd ed #6111). Palo Alto, CA: Consulting Psychologists Press.

    Lawrence, Gordon D. (2010). Finding the Zone: A Whole New Way to Maximize Mental Potential. Amherst, NY: Prometheus Books.

    Dunning, Donna (2008). Introduction to Type and Learning. Palo Alto, CA: Consulting Psychologists Press.

    Hirsh, E., Hirsh, K., & Hirsh, S. (2003). Introduction to Type and Teams. Mountain View, CA: Consulting Psychologists Press.

    Keirsey, David, & Bates, Marilyn. (1984). Please Understand Me: Character and Temperament Types. Del Mar, CA: Gnosology Books Ltd.

    Tieger, Paul D., & Barron-Tieger, Barbara. (1997). Nurture by Nature: Understand Your Child’s Personality Type – And Become a Better Parent. Canada: Little, Brown & Company Ltd.

    Haas, Leona, & Hunziker, Mark (2011). Building Blocks of Personality Type: A Guide to Discovering the Hidden Secrets of the Personality Type Code. Temecula, CA: TypeLabs.

    Tieger, Paul D., & Barron, Barbara. (2007). Do What You Are: Discover the Perfect Career for You Through the Secrets of Personality Type. Canada: Little, Brown & Company Ltd.

    Briggs Myers, Isabel, & Myers, Peter B. (1995). Gifts Differing: Understanding Personality Type. Mountain View, CA: CPP.

    Kroeger, Otto, & Thuesen, Janet M. (1998). Type Talk: The 16 Personality Types That Determine How We Live, Love, and Work. New York, NY: Dell Publishing.

    Lawrence, Gordon (1996). People Types and Tiger Stripes: Using Psychological Type to Help Students Discover Their Unique Potential. Gainesville, FL: Center for Applications of Psychological Type, Inc.

    Kemp, Anthony E. (1996). The Musical Temperament: Psychology and Personality of Musicians. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

    Zichy, Shoya, & Bidou, Ann (2007). Career Match: Connecting Who You Are with What You’ll Love to Do. New York, NY: AMACOM.

    Multiple Intelligence Theory

    Gardner, Howard (2006). Multiple Intelligences: New Horizons in Theory and Practice. New York, NY: Basic Books.

    Gardner, Howard (1999). Intelligence Reframed: Multiple Intelligences for the 21st Century. New York, NY: Basic Books.

    Silver, H., Strong, R., Perini, M. (2000). So Each May Learn: Integrating Learning Styles and Multiple Intelligences. Alexandria, VA: ASCD.

    Gardner, Howard (2006). Five Minds for the Future. Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Publishing.

    Armstrong, Thomas (1999). 7 (Seven) Kinds of Smart: Identifying and Developing Your Multiple Intelligences. New York, NY: Penguin Group.

    Armstrong, Thomas (2000). In Their Own Way: Discovering and Encouraging Your Child’s Multiple Intelligences. New York, NY: Penguin Putnam.

    Armstrong, Thomas (2003). You’re Smarter Than You Think: A Kid’s Guide to Multiple Intelligences. Minneapolis, MN: Free Spirit Publishing.

    Brualdi, Amy C. (1996). Multiple Intelligences: Gardner’s Theory. Washington, DC: ERIC Digests.

    Schmidt, Laurel (2001). Seven Times Smarter: 50 Activities, Games, and Projects to Develop the Seven Intelligences of Your Child. New York, NY: Three Rivers Press.

    Grosswirth, Marvin, Salny, Abbie F., Stillson, Alan (1999). Match Wits With Mensa: The Complete Quiz Book (Mensa Genius Quiz). Cambridge, MA: Perseus Books.

    Bellanca, James A. (2009). 200+ Active Learning Strategies and Projects for Engaging Students’ Multiple Intelligences. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

    Koch, Kathy (2007). How am I Smart?: A Parent’s Guide to Multiple Intelligences. Chicago, IL: Moody Publishers.

    Cognitive Style

    Fuller, Cheri (2004). Talkers, Watchers, and Doers: Unlocking Your Child’s Unique Learning Style (School Savvy Kids). Colorado Springs, CO: Pinon Press.

    Tobias, Cynthia Ulrich (1994). The Way They Learn. Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Publishers, Inc.

    Willis, Mariaemma & Hodson, Victoria Kindle (1999). Discover Your Child’s Learning Style: Children Learn in Unique Ways – Here’s the Key to Every Child’s Learning Success. New York, NY: Three Rivers Press.

    Walsh, Brian E. (2011). VAK Self-Audit: Visual, Auditory, and Kinesthetic Communication And Learning Styles: Exploring Patterns of How You Interact And Learn. Victoria, BC: Walsh Seminars Publishing House.

    Sousa, David, et. Al. (2010). Mind, Brain, and Education: Neuroscience Implications for the Classroom (Leading Edge (Solution Tree)). Bloomington, IN: Solution Tree Press.

    Tokuhama-Espinosa, T. (2011). Mind, Brain, and Education Science: A Comprehensive Guide to the New Brain-Based Teaching. New York, NY: W.W. Norton & Company, Inc.

    Oczkus, Lori D. (2003). Reciprocal Teaching at Work: Strategies for Improving Reading Comprehension. Newark, DE: International Reading Association.

    Hoyt, Linda (2002). Make It Real: Strategies for Success with Informational Texts. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.

  • 10 Tips When Helping Your Children to Choose Their Science Fair Projects

    10 Tips When Helping Your Children to Choose Their Science Fair Projects

    Science fair season has become increasingly more competitive. This is because the stakes at these events are no longer limited to ribbons and plaques. There are…

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    10 Tips When Helping Your Children to Choose Their Science Fair Projects

    Science fair season has become increasingly more competitive. This is because the stakes at these events are no longer limited to ribbons and plaques. There are big money rewards to be won and chances to impress college entrance boards as well. All of these factors make it necessary for students to gain every advantage that they can. One way to gain an advantage is to utilize a science fair kit as the raw materials for a project.

    Find A Science Kit with Parts and Tools

    The first tip to use when choosing kids science fair kits is to select a kit that comes with parts and tools, as opposed to a completely assembled project. This option will give students the chance to both complete the experiments that are outlined in the kit and to create their own projects and experiments using the parts. These are the only kits that will be acceptable at science fairs.

    Select Age Appropriate Kits

    It is important to select a kid’s science fair kit that is age appropriate for your young scientist. Young kids will need project kits that do not have small parts that could pose a choking hazard, and older students will need kits that will challenge their minds. Also age appropriateness is important for providing students with the raw materials needed to complete a project that will do well at a science fair.

    One That Follows the Scientific Method

    If your student will be using the kids’ science fair kits in their science fair project then you will need to select one that follows the scientific method. This will help your child to learn how to complete the scientific method as well as ensure that their final project will be appropriate for a science fair.

    Multiple Projects Possible

    To give your student the most options for their own science fair projects you will want to select a science fair kit that is designed for the completion of several different experiments. This will ensure that there are enough raw materials left over after the student completes the sample project to complete their own experiments.

    Safety Issues

    Safety is an issue that you need to think about when purchasing a science fair kit. This is why it is important to look at who manufactured the kit and where it was manufactured.

    Safety Supplies

    One sign that a science kit is a quality product is that it comes with safety equipment. Safety equipment like goggles, gloves and face masks are common safety equipment.

    Topics Impact Science Fair Score

    If your student wants to win a science fair, then they will need to create a project that is interesting and that is focused on a topic that is important to today’s scientists. This means that you will need to select a science kit that has a topic that fits these criteria.

    Shelf Life

    When shopping for a science fair kit you will want to look at when the kit was packaged. Some ingredients will have a shelf life. If a package looks faded or tampered with select another box or kit.

    Ordering Extra Supplies

    Selecting a science kit that has been manufactured by a reputable company is a good idea. Usually these companies will allow parents to place order for refill kits or to purchase extra tools and supplies directly from the company.

    Fun Project Kits

    The final tip is to select a science kit that looks like it is going to be fun. If the kit looks dull then your scientist is not going to want to play with the kit and if they do use the kit to develop a science fair project then their project will most likely also be boring.

    Featured images:
    •  License: Royalty Free or iStock source: http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/results.aspx?qu=experiment&ex=1#ai:MP900399789|mt:2|

    When helping your child to choose a science fair kit what is most important is that the child chooses what is of interest to him/her.

  • Fall Recipes Your Kids will “Gobble Gobble” Up

    Fall Recipes Your Kids will “Gobble Gobble” Up

    Few things are close to cooking for at-home learning activities that don’t feel like learning. There’s math involved in measuring and adjusting recipes; linguistic smarts involved in…

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    Fall Recipes Your Kids will “Gobble Gobble” Up

    Cooking with Kids...Fall StyleFew things are close to cooking for at-home learning activities that don’t feel like learning. There’s math involved in measuring and adjusting recipes; linguistic smarts involved in recipes & reviews; kinesthetic work involved in chopping/kneading/stirring/etc; interpersonal & communication skills involved since a parent needs to be in the kitchen monitoring the cook time; you can even include some naturalist skills by chatting about why “in season” is important.

    Check out our Pinterest board of some of the Fall family favorites in our house.

    We’ll be adding to the board all month… we hope you like them, too! We recommend trying some of these pre-Thanksgiving and, if the family likes one or more recipes, let your child(ren) make their own contribution(s) to your Thanksgiving table.