• Kidzmet’s Teacher Student Fit Evaluations

    Just as a seed needs to first grow roots, then develop a shoot, then a bud before becoming a flower, introductions to new pursuits for children…

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    Kidzmet’s Teacher Student Fit Evaluations

    teacher student fit evaluationsJust as a seed needs to first grow roots, then develop a shoot, then a bud before becoming a flower, introductions to new pursuits for children need to be approached in a similar way. Kidzmet members use our teacher student fit evaluations in three key ways:

    • Parents often put their child as the main profile in their member dashboard and use the student profiles to evaluate the fit of potential tutors, enrichment teachers, or coaches.
    • Teachers and/or tutors put themselves as the main profile in their member dashboard and profile all of their students to identify where they may need to modify their teaching approach.
    • Homeschoolers put themselves as the main profile on the account and profile their children as students so that they can easily see with which kids they need to modify their curriculum selections.

    Here’s how you’ll see the “fit types” defined on Kidzmet…

    Natural fit :: a compatible personality type, matching cognitive style and many parallel interests and strengths make this a comfortable teacher-student relationship from the outset where the teacher and student intuitively connect.

    Complement fit :: this teacher is compatible with the student on many levels, but different enough to be able to stretch the student’s understanding of the world and what makes other individuals tick. A good way to discover new passions and ways to learn.

    Growth fit :: while not an intuitive fit, when both students and teachers are aware of each other’s “ingredients” (e.g. personality, interests and learning style), they can learn to adapt to create a relationship built on mutual understanding. An incredibly valuable match because the student has the opportunity to learn how to interact in a positive way with colleagues and family members that share this personality type.

  • Using Personality Type to Enhance Music Education

    Using Personality Type to Enhance Music Education

    Bonnie TeVelde wasn't always a music school director—she started as an accountant and business operations consultant that helped clients develop their businesses. She was frustrated and…

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    Using Personality Type to Enhance Music Education

    Bonnie TeVelde wasn't always a music school director—she started as an accountant and business operations consultant that helped clients develop their businesses. She was frustrated and started a music education on the side to fill her soul in a way her day job couldn't. As her music business grew, she really loved it and felt like she wasn't working–she just "went into the zone"–and realized that teaching music was what she was MEANT to do.

    Pairing Music Education Students and Teachers by Personality

    Bonnie discovered firsthand as both a music student and a school director that the typical people who make it through high-level music school are really detail-oriented extroverts (Extroverted Sensing Thinking Judgers) because they:

    * require extroverted qualities (E) for performing,

    * have to be detail-oriented to play the notes exactly as conducted or written (ST), and

    * are very scheduled individuals that are product-oriented (J)

    …and those are the people who typically decide to teach music.

    However, ESTJs are typically self-minded from a personality perspective, which makes it challenging for them to be successful teachers because teaching is all about the STUDENT. Since Bonnie had been a music minor that loved psychology during college, she began pairing the two disciplines as she grew her music business, and started matching the personality type of the student to the personality type of the teacher. (As an INFP, Bonnie intuitively knew to be more flexible with the "perceiving" kids in her classes and encourage them to play for the love of music versus scheduled daily practices.)

    And she watched her student attrition rates drop as a result.

    But even with the most nurturing teacher/student relationship for the "Perceiving" students during lessons, she saw a trend after 6 months that they no longer had the zest for music that they had when they began…and began to see that the "Perceiving" students coming in that really adored playing music were inadvertently thwarted by "Judging" parents that wanted their kids to be on a practice routin–and that the "Judging" students with "Perceiving" parents weren't adhering to a more disciplined practice regimen and lost interest after several months. So she started coaching her parents with mismatched personality types on how to better nurture their little musicians…and she was thrilled to see her student attrition rates drop even further. Best of all, the program served to further nurture fledgling musicians versus potentially squelching talent solely because the mentoring style of the teacher or parent didn't fit the student.

    Success in Music Breeds Success in School

    Pairing students with music mentors of matching personality types reaped benefits beyond the music school walls. All but TWO of the students from the teVelde School of Music's 100+ student roster are on their schools' honor rolls. Bonnie feels that this is because music education doesn't just teach music…it teaches attention to detail; greater connections between the right and left hemispheres of the brain because both child's hands are occupied simultaneously while playing; and a stick-to-itiveness that is ingrained through a first-hand knowledge that "practice makes perfect". This mirrors several studies that shows that spatial reasoning increases by 34% in music students, IQs rise by several points as a result of music instruction, and music majors have the HIGHEST acceptance rates by university medical programs.

    Perfect Absolute Pitch

    Another unique dimension of the teVelde program's music curriculum is Perfect Absolute Pitch (PAP) for 2-6 year olds. These private lessons can help get a labeling system in place for pitch that is akin to the brain's labeling system for color. (How do you know you're looking at an orange piece of paper? You instinctively know it after being trained to match the tone with the appropriate label. How do you know you're hearing a "G" on the keyboard? You can only if you've trained your brain how to label that pitch as a G…regardless of octave.) Perhaps this metaphor is why PAP is often referred to "hearing in color".

    Bonnie emphasizes that if your child has three or more of the seven signs of musical talent (click here to read them all), it is critical that they start music lessons as young as possible, since the ability to develop PAP is significantly hindered if you don't expose your child to a PAP program before the age of six.

    Per Bonnie, almost all of the truly great composers in history had PAP, including Bach, Beethoven, Bartok, Chopin, Handel, Mozart, Rimsky-Korsakoff, Saint-Saens, and more. Some famous 20th /21st Century performers that have PAP are: Julie Andrews, Leonard Bernstein, Mariah Carey, Nat King Cole, Bing Crosby, Miles Davis, Celine Dion, Ella Fitzgerald, Marvin Hamlisch, Jimi Hendrix, Vladimir Horowitz, Michael Jackson, Yo-Yo Ma, Yngwie Malmstein, Andre Previn, Artur Rubinstein, Paul Shaffer, Frank Sinatra, Barbra Streisand, Arturo Toscanini, Steve Vai, Brian Wilson, Stevie Wonder, Yanni, and more.

    In fact, 69% of popular musicians have PAP, compared to the general population percentages which are 1/10,000 with the genetic ability, and much less than that who actually have training early enough to develop it fully. Bonnie is quick to note that not every child who is musical will become a great musician, even if they start young. But, if you really believe your child is musical, why would you deny them the chance of developing the one ability that could set them apart from most the other musicians out there?

    More Information

    For more in-depth information on Bonnie and the teVelde School of Music, we encourage you to visit the school's website here.

    Thanks to Bonnie and all of her instructors for giving children the gift of music education that's taught in a way that truly embraces and respects each student's unique spirit.

  • The Introverted Sensing Personality Type for Kids (ISJ)

    The Introverted Sensing Personality Type for Kids (ISJ)

    The ISJ personality type for kids is indicative of incredible powers of concentration. ISJ kids love to have plenty of time to work independently in a…

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    The Introverted Sensing Personality Type for Kids (ISJ)

    The ISJ personality type for kids is indicative of incredible powers of concentration. ISJ kids love to have plenty of time to work independently in a logical way—just like the ISFJ and ISTJ adults they grow-up to be. Often risk-averse, they prefer not to experiment and prefer situations where A + B always equals C. ISJ personality types love rules and explicit objectives. The opposite of procrastinators, these kids like to have adequate time to prepare for and reach their goals.

    Natural students, these kids thrive in traditional structured environments where their meticulous attention to detail and natural propensity toward organization is valued—even if it’s behind the scenes. Very private people, ISJ personality types are cautious and reserved and abhor being the center of attention. (Sound familiar, ISFJ and ISTJ parents?) They can get nervous and anxious if they are presented with situations or problems that they don’t already know how to think about or solve. For this reason, classes that are open-ended or objectively assessed may not be great fits for these kids.

    Given their introverted nature, it’s best to enroll kids with an ISJ personality type in 1:1 teacher to student classes or with small teacher to student ratios. These kids will often gravitate toward music classes or computer programming. Spelling bees are also often favorites of the ISJ personality type. If you prefer to engage your child in a larger group environment, perhaps consider an orchestra or chorus, where all the kids involved are working toward the same, clearly defined goal. Because of their desire for stability, rules and routine, you’ll often find that kids with ISJ personality types will continue with a certain type of classes over a period of many years, continually setting and achieving higher and higher goals for themselves along a knowledge ladder.

    Though introverted, these kids have a strong need to feel like a part of a larger community. As a result, “behind the scenes” work is often a good fit. Cooking classes supplemented by baking cupcakes for a school bake sale is a good example of how to make both sides of this particular personality type's nature flourish.

    Musical children with an ISJ personality type do well studying an instrument for their own enjoyment, without having to perform in front of an audience. (Although they do well learning, and then recording their songs, then giving them as gifts to their families for the birthdays and holidays.) They do not do well performing solos, but are usually fine performing in a group like in a band or orchestra environment. Kids with ISJ personality types love to play instruments that can be played independently, without having to rely on other musicians. They love having their instruments in their rooms, so they can go to them and play when they are feeling stressed. It is important that they are never, ever, pressured to perform. Parents may mean well, but this can have a particularly negative impact on this personality type.

    Ever respectful of rules, guidelines, and consistency, the teachers of children with an ISJ personality type who adhere to a stated course curriculum, and start and end classes on time, are often favorites. 

    These recommendations are just the beginning…

    Learn even more about how your Introverted Sensor is uniquely wired to learn as a Kidzmet member.

    join our growing community →
    introverted sensing personality type ISJ ISFJ ISTJ

  • Introverted Intuitive Personality Type (AKA INFJ or INTJ Children)

    Introverted Intuitive Personality Type (AKA INFJ or INTJ Children)

    Integrity and independence are strong forces within Introverted Intuitives (INJ). These kids are very concerned with identifying approaches to problems that help others to grow and…

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    Introverted Intuitive Personality Type (AKA INFJ or INTJ Children)

    Integrity and independence are strong forces within Introverted Intuitives (INJ). These kids are very concerned with identifying approaches to problems that help others to grow and develop. Service-oriented, INJ children have most likely been interested in ideas that benefit the masses from an early age and were in tune with personal values and belief systems far earlier than most kids. A perfectionist who is often perceived as serious and intense, INFJ and INTJ kids have a gift for honing in on a subject of interest and will continue to develop their talents until they have reached a level of mastery.

    Homework Approach/Tactics

    • Help your INxJ work from the top-down (e.g. big idea first, then the nitty-gritty) and from the unknown to the known (e.g. hypothesis first, then proof/support).
    • Encourage the use of examples to illustrate points in order to help draw out the details required for a high grade.
    • Introducing your INJ child to mind maps can help clarify thoughts and provide the details that they tend to gloss over. They can also help him identify a single thread to pursue and frame the project after exploring the myriad of tangents.
    • Your INJ enjoys the idea phase of assignments much more than the production phase.
    • Because breadth is more interesting to your INJ than depth, be sure to reinforce when topics require more attention—particularly when it is a building block to the next topic.
    • The consummate planner, an introverted intuitive will appreciate a recommended timeline for assignment completion rather than a single deadline and may become anxious or distressed when juggling multiple long-term assignments.
    • Let your introverted intuitive child know when time is almost up for completing an activity (e.g. 5 minute warning).
    • Your INJ likes to adhere to boundaries and rules and may label you “unfair” if rules are not enforced equally for all siblings.

    Interactions with Others

    • If you plan study groups for your INFJ or INTJ child, be sure to make them small or comprised of other introverts. If you are an extraverted parent working with an introverted intuitive child, be patient, as your INJ’s strength is to think through responses in their head, then offer a conclusion once they've formulated a complete response.
    • An introverted intuitive child recharges their batteries with alone time. As such, allow a short window after school for your INJ to recenter before embarking upon homework assignments. However, don't wait too long, as the pressure of looming dinnertime/bedtime can cause anxiety for her.

    Study Skills Development

    • Help your child develop completion plans for long-term assignments and, should something come up that interferes with the original plan, help them to develop an alternate one. Introducing her to tools like OpenProj or Microsoft Project can prove extremely beneficial.
    • The greatest gift you can give an introverted intuitive child as a parent is to help develop his/her inner critic, so that he can forsee difficulties, modify his vision/inspiration and act appropriately. 

    These recommendations are just the beginning…

    Learn even more about how your Extraverted Thinker is uniquely wired to learn as a Kidzmet member.

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    introverted intuitive personality type INJ INFJ INTJ

  • The Extraverted Thinking Child

    The Extraverted Thinking Child

    Capable, decisive and organized, your Extraverted Thinker (ETJ) will most likely be at the pinnacle of business as an adult. ESTJ and ENTJ children like to…

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    The Extraverted Thinking Child

    Capable, decisive and organized, your Extraverted Thinker (ETJ) will most likely be at the pinnacle of business as an adult. ESTJ and ENTJ children like to be in control and enjoys situations that challenge and stimulate them within the context of interacting with a variety of people. Ambitious by nature, this type of child thrives on competition and public accolades. The extraverted thinking child believes that behavior should be logical and probably finds listening to another person’s perspective to be challenging.  People probably often guess that extraverted thinking kids are older than their chronological ages.

    Ambitious by nature, the Extraverted Thinker (ETJ) thrives on competition and public accolades. It’s important to get this child into groups that help them channel their abundant energy so that they don’t let it escalate into overaggression.

    Homework Approach/Tactics

    • This child has a gift for the analytical and relishes problem solving and likes to find flaws in ideas or plans. Use this innate talent to help your extraverted thinking child edit initial homework drafts and understand how he ro she can make not just this, but future assignments even better.
    • A natural debater, an extraverted thinker has a natural gift for justifying answers and defending positions. As such, if your ESTJ or ENTJ child earns a low score or grade, be sure to ask the teacher to be specific with critiques so that you can help him overcome issues in the future.
    • The consummate planner, an extroverted thinker may become anxious or distressed when juggling multiple long-term assignments. If he is given a single deadline for an assignment, work with your extroverted thinking child to develop interim steps and deadlines so that he or she can play to the ETJs strength of approaching multiple assignments like an endurance runner instead of a sprinter.
    • Encourage your child to complete homework as early as possible, so that he or she doesn’t encounter undue stress related to bedtime, favorite show coming on, etc. In this same vein, be sure to let this student know when time is almost up for completing an activity (e.g. 5 minute warning).
    • This student likes to adhere to boundaries and rules and may label you “unfair” if homework rules are not enforced equally for all siblings in the family.

    Learning-Based Interactions with Others

    • This student learns well from study groups, as verbalizing thoughts helps this student think through problems.
    • Ensure this student is in a quiet part of the house when working through a particularly difficult assignment, as other noises and conversations can be extremely distracting.

    Study & Life Skills Development

    • Encourage this child to accept both success and defeat with grace. Help your child develop an appreciation of other’s merits—not simply focus what needs to be corrected.
    • Help your child develop completion plans for long-term assignments and, should something come up that interferes with the original plan, help them to develop an alternate one. Introducing this student to tools like OpenProj or Microsoft Project can prove to be extremely beneficial tools.
    • Helping this student to develop coping mechanisms when things don’t go as planned is one of the greatest gifts you can give your extroverted thinker. Kidzmet® recommends layering your child’s Multiple Intelligence preferences to help take your child’s feelings of frustration, anger or fear to a more joyful, peaceful place.

    These recommendations are just the beginning…

    Learn even more about how your Extraverted Thinker is uniquely wired to learn as a Kidzmet member.

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    extraverted thinking personality type ETJ ENTJ ESTJ

  • The Introverted Thinking Child

    The Introverted Thinking Child

    The ITP child is a process-oriented problem solver that is quick to learn new things and most likely relishes both independence and unstructured environments where this…

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    The Introverted Thinking Child

    The ITP child is a process-oriented problem solver that is quick to learn new things and most likely relishes both independence and unstructured environments where this child can focus on discovering unconventional ways to analyze and solve complex problems. Often shy except with their best friends, people like this child often don't enjoy being told what to do…but probably don’t want to tell others what to do, either. this child's special challenge is probably making their ideas understood, as s/he tends to overcomplicate issues.

    Homework Approach/Tactics

    • Your introverted thinker relishes problem solving and likes to find flaws in ideas or plans. A natural debater, your child will try to justify answers or defend positions both with others. As such, both parents and teachers should be specific with both critiques and praise of an introverted thinker’s assignments and/or attitudes.
    • This child most likely produces the best work under the pressure of a single precise deadline versus a time line with multiple due dates, so having a calendar with upcoming long-term project due dates highlighted will allow your introverted thinker to keep percolating on general ideas and themes for each assignment, then sprint to the finish with final drafts. Your child’s perceiving nature finds strength in "pulling all-nighters" on assignments, which can be a real challenge for parents with judging personality types.
    • Use words like “try”, “experiment” or “attempt” with Introverted Thinkers. 
    • Try to avoid words like “practice”, “should” and “work”.

    Interactions with Others

    • If you'd like to plan a study group for your child, be sure to keep it small and, preferably with other introverts, as Introverted Thinkers prefer to think through responses before offering a perspective, and will hesitate to interrupt the flow of conversation—even if they’ve formulated a response.
    • Your child recharges his or her batteries with alone time, so be sure to allow time for solitary "recentering" each day before starting homework.

    Study Skills Development 

    • Encourage your young ITP child to accept both success and defeat with grace.
    • Help your introverted thinking child give praise when it's due and (2) bring up what s/he agrees during a discussion before pointing out the areas where they disagree.
    • One of the most important skills you can teach this type of child is how to better estimate how long an assignment will take—e.g., planning work from the due date backward.

    These recommendations are just the beginning…

    Learn even more about how your Introverted Thinker is uniquely wired to learn as a Kidzmet member.



    join our growing community →

    These recommendations are just the beginning…

    Learn even more about how your Extraverted Thinker is uniquely wired to learn as a Kidzmet member.

    introverted thinking personality type ITP INTP ISTP

  • The Introverted Feeling Child

    The Introverted Feeling Child

    Expressive visionaries, kids with an IFP personality type often feel most at home in the arts. They love to understand what makes people tick and enjoy…

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    The Introverted Feeling Child

    Expressive visionaries, kids with an IFP personality type often feel most at home in the arts. They love to understand what makes people tick and enjoy deep one-on-one relationships with others. IFP personality types voice their innermost feelings through their art, but prefer not to share their work product until they feel it’s complete–which should sound familiar to INFP and ISFP adults. They enjoy the learning process and like “meaningful” pursuits that are consistent with deeply held inner values…but don’t like to do things in traditional or routine ways.

    IFP personality types have a tremendous amount of patience for complex tasks and have a knack for tuning into others’ needs or motivations. These kids are most likely to thrive in a supportive, cooperative one-on-one or small group setting.

    Akin to Florence Nightingale, these quiet and gentle spirits love animals, small babies and those that need their help. IFP personality types are generally conflict averse and often take on the role of peacemaker in a class. (Something that continues to be a big part of INFP and ISFP profiles as adults.)

    As we so often recommend, definitely take the time to chat with an instructor before enrolling a child with an IFP personality type in an enrichment activity. These children can be extremely sensitive and become defensive or emotional when criticized, but tend to let negative feelings build up inside of them instead of rocking the boat. IFP personality types are dreamers and sometimes don’t have a good handle on time or schedules, so they can irritate some teachers with tardy arrivals, slow pace completing assignments and procrastination. Similarly, teachers you select for this personality type should feel comfortable using a reward (not punishment) system to encourage good behavior from IFP personality types by drawing on their people pleasing nature.

    Enrichment activities that appeal most to this personality type often include music, art, writing, nature and science classes with a clear human connection. Groups like 4-H and FFA often also appeal to these kids. Because children with an IFP personality type often have trouble following projects through all the way to completion, encouraging them to stick with classes through the session will help them learn the value of finishing what they start.

    Musical children with an IFP personality type do well studying an instrument for their own enjoyment, without having to perform in front of an audience. (Although they do well learning, and then recording their songs, then giving them as gifts to their families for the birthdays and holidays.) They do not do well performing solos, but are usually fine performing in a group like in a band or orchestra environment. IFPs love to play instruments that can be played independently, without having to rely on other musicians. They love having their instruments in their rooms, so they can go to them and play when they are feeling stressed. This is especially true for Introverted Feelers, who can get stressed, exhausted, and sensitive when they are at school all day. Music is an excellent outlet for those emotions, when done in a safe environment. It is important that they are never, ever, pressured to perform. Parents may mean well, but this can have a particularly negative impact on this personality type.

    Learn even more about how your Introverted Feeler is uniquely wired to learn as a Kidzmet member.



    join our growing community →
    introverted feeling personality type IFP INFP ISFP